The Dying Gaul

The first time I saw the sculpture of the Dying Gaul {Hellenistic period, c. 230–c. 220 BC; marble} was in February 2014 in the Pantheon shaped rotunda of the National Gallery of Art. The Italian government organized an artistic exchange program in 2013 marking the “Year of Italian Culture”, where centuries old pieces that had never left Italy were brought to the United States for viewing.

But, while in Rome at the Musei Capitolini you walk up steps into a gallery where the back of this sculpture is your first view. Next you begin to walk around the piece taking in items that are rarely seen from books; beside the warrior there is a trumpet, a sword, and a pentagram near one of his feet. To have time to view the sculpture without severe crowds was an honor, and seeing small details in the physical appearance of the Gaul, such as veins in his arms or the crease around the torso is absolutely exquisite.

Musei Capitonlini
Piazza del Campidoglio, 1, 00186 Roma RM, Italy

National Gallery of Art
Washington, DC 20565

Washington Post Article, December 12, 2013

The Georgetowner
1050 30th St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
January 26, 2014

Enjoy, Kathleen

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7 thoughts on “The Dying Gaul

    1. I was in a college art course when I saw the Dying Gaul in books. The sculpture came to the National Gallery in Washington, DC for a brief exhibit. Then while in Rome five years ago had the opportunity to visit the Capitoline Museum with few people in the gallery to truly view the artwork, it was an astonishing experience.

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      1. When I was there an instructor with his class came through. It was enlightening to listen to what he had to say about the history and style. But the impact of just seeing the sculpture in person, with all its detail and nuances is what created a vivid jewel of experience for me.

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